Grade 8 Art – Comparing themes of War & Nature

Käthe Kollwitz (July 8, 1867 – April 22, 1945) was a German painter, printmaker, and sculptor whose work offered an eloquent and often searing account of the human condition, and the tragedy of war, in the first half of the 20th century. Her empathy for the less fortunate, expressed most famously through the graphic means of drawing, etching, lithography, and woodcut, embraced the victims of poverty, hunger, and war.[1][2] Initially her work was grounded in Naturalism, and later took on Expressionistic qualities.[3]

 

 

 

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish pronunciation: [fɾanˈθisko xoˈse ðe ˈɣoʝa i luˈθjentes]; 30 March 1746–16 April 1828) was a Spanish romantic painter and printmaker regarded both as the last of the Old Masters and the first of the moderns. Goya was a court painter to the Spanish Crown, and through his works was both a commentator on and chronicler of his era. The subversive and imaginative element in his art, as well as his bold handling of paint, provided a model for the work of later generations of artists, notably Manet, Picasso and Francis Bacon.[1]

 

Themes of Nature

 

 

Katsushika Hokusai (葛飾 北斎?, September 23, 1760 – May 10, 1849)[1] was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period. He was influenced by such painters as Sesshu, and other styles of Chinese painting.[2] Born in Edo (now Tokyo), Hokusai is best known as author of the woodblock print series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (富嶽三十六景 Fugaku Sanjūroku-kei?, c. 1831) which includes the internationally recognized print, The Great Wave off Kanagawa, created during the 1820s.

 

Adams, Ansel (Feb. 20 1902 — Apr. 22, 1984), photographer and environmentalist, was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Charles Hitchcock Adams, a businessman, and Olive Bray. The grandson of a wealthy timber baron, Adams grew up in a house set amid the sand dunes of the Golden Gate. When Adams was only four, an aftershock of the great earthquake and fire of 1906 threw him to the ground and badly broke his nose, distinctly marking him for life. A year later the family fortune collapsed in the financial panic of 1907, and Adams’s father spent the rest of his life doggedly but fruitlessly attempting to recoup.

 

From the curriculum

D2.1 interpret a variety of art works and identify
the feelings, issues, themes, and social concerns
that they convey (e.g., hold a mock debate
between artists on a topic such as the emotional
impact of realist versus expressionist styles of art;
compare art works in different artistic media
that express a common theme, such as wartime
suffering in the art work of Käthe Kollwitz and
Francisco Goya; interpret images of social issues
that are explored in historical art works, contemporary
art works, and media arts)
Teacher prompts: “How can a landscape image
express ideas or concepts, such as the power
of nature in works by printmaker Hokusai or
photographer Ansel Adams?” “How have you
been influenced by art work from other cultures
or historical periods?” “What makes one
image a stereotyped illustration and another
image an authentic expression?”

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Posted on March 6, 2012, in Grade 8 Art. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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